Skip to main content

Food for thought

There is a cliched Miss India question " How will u explain the colour red to a blind man?", relatively simple question I would say , considering I am training to be an eye surgeon.. now what they really should be asking is " How do you explain butter garlic prawns and reshmi kabab to a vegetarian?" Now there is a googly question.
Its funny how all the vocabulary, in all the languages one knows just falls short, in just trying to describe even the simplest of dishes. How do you even begin to try and explain rasmalai to a foreigner..' soft cottage cheese,in a delectable creamy sauce flavoured with saffron, and garnished with crushed pistachio' just doesn't seem to do justice.
Food! Good food!! All my gesturing, facial expressions, multiple adjectives cannot describe the flavour, the texture, the taste, the experience of having cremaux chocolate fudge cookies, or ma's Christmas plum cake...it's almost like being handicapped. It's like not being able to talk, or talking in a foreign language, not being able to make the other person understand.
That is why I have such high regard for people like pritish nandy, who made me taste oysters, in his article in the hindustan times many years ago. That is why at the tender age of 15 I wrote to a guy ( I think his name was sanjay mukherjee) who used to write a food section in pune times, saying "I want to write like you." Almost a decade later I realise that it was not just my love for writing, but my love for food, which had made me want to leave a prestigious med school, to write. That is why ratatouille , chocolat are one of my fav movies... because they try to crystallise something so sublime as food!

P.S. - It's amazing how Miss India contestants manage to bring Mahatma Gandhi and Mother Teresa into trying to explain red to a blind person, I wonder what they would say in trying to describe butter garlic prawns..
maybe something like.." I am an Indian (pause for claps), I believe that reshmi kabab and butter gartlic prawns signify the true blend of style with substance ( pause for claps), I am reminded of the great freedom fight of Mahatma Gandhi when he carried out the Dandi March to collect salt from the sea...and thus lead India to freedom and a tasty future. (thundering applause)

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

birthday retrospect : Lebensmude and other Midlife things

This year will be the 11 th Birthday retrospect;it is a promise I keep to myself, where I write my thoughts on growing a year older. I started writing a birthday retrospect on my 25th birthday and this year being my 35th birthday post. (read last years post  BR 2018 )
This year went by in a blur –and I was happy about it. Earlier, my reaction used to be, “ Oh my God! This week went by so fast, where did the time go?” , but this year I couldn’t wait for the months to roll by. I was in a WHY IS LIFE TAKING SO MUCH TIME TO PASS BY mode . Ah! I can feel that a lot of people reading this are going to be surprised by this. Because I have always been someone plugging my day with many things to do, I was someone who was a ‘go getter’ kind of person, so much to do in life, so much to see in life, the girl with the biggest FOMO or Fear of missing out. This year I had flipped completely to the opposite spectrum. I didn’t want to do anything new. It wasn’t like I was demeaning the act of disco…

The gift

A few days back a close friend of mine received a gift. A large box wrapped in purple gift wrapping, ribbons and all, with a note saying “thank you doctor, from the Martins family” * (name changed to protect privacy)
A sweet gesture which a few patients still followed. A token of gratitude apart from the fees they paid and the medical bills. The medical profession has been subjected to major mud slinging in the past few years and small gestures of gratitude and appreciation mean a lot to us trying to do the best we possibly can.
But this gift was different.
“your patients must really like you.” I said, especially since I knew that many of his patients considered him family, and would get him fruits from their gardens, home made wines or cakes for Christmas, sweets on Diwali.
the patient died. She had terminal cancer, there wasn’t much that I could do. I didn’t want to take the gift, but the family insisted…” he replied
The doctor patient relationship is a tenuous one. The giver and …