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the namesake

The bouganvillea is definitely the step flower child of God. I mean to be stuck with a name like THAT!! It's okay for a French Navy Admiral to be called 'Louis Antoine De Bouganville' but the narcissist named a flower after himself! what had the poor thing ever done to him?
So now you have the bouganvillea, a humble little flowering plant. Just an average plain jane, even the petals aren't pretty, they aren't even called petals! The faux petals are actually 'bracts' and the look like coloured leaves more than petals. Miss plain Jane ain't as talented as it's pretty cousin the rose, you see it doesn't smell sweet either. I mean imagine shakespeare saying.. 'what's in a name.. a bouganvillea will never smell sweet even if it were called a rose."
The bouganvillea, is your typical 'adjusting / compromising' woman, doesn't mind it if she is made to grow on the dividers of national highways , amongst dust and grime and the whizing cars. She is always part of the flowering hedge surrounding the garden and never part of the actual 'garden' itself. You'll never see a boy gift a girl a bouquet of bouganvilleas.The only time a bouganvillea features in a hindi movie is when , sometimes during a song sequence the hero tucks in a single bouganvillea in the heroines hair. Why? because all the other flowers in the garden have huge boards which read 'DO NOT PLUCK'.
When all the other pretty flowers wilt and wither away from the hot summer sun, our hardy little miss no'fuss comes to our rescue once again , with her profusion of colours.
So this goes out to all those women out there who feel like a bouganvillea. plain looking, with no apparent talent, who feel like the abused little step child of God .. You may not be in the spot light, you may never make it as the centre piece of a flower bouquet, the decor of the wedding reception, you might never even make it into the garden proper... but in the long highway of life.. you are what brings cheer to the traveller. kyunki bouganvillea jaisi koi nahi!! :)

Comments

Meghana said…
Hey, that's an interesting take on a so-far neglected flower. I quite like the humble grower myself, and have had the pink variety flowering in my garden for the past two years. Even as my rose shrub and hibiscus give us a rare bloom, the bouganvillea continues to prettify the ambience unabashedly. I'm sure if it could, it would thank you for giving it an overdue 'lifetime achievement award' of sorts. :)
Kunal K said…
It echoes the thought that Even if you could make one person smile ,your life on earth is not wasted..Life is beautiful !

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